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Women in IT Awards Security Champion Interview: Jane Frankland, Managing Director, Cyber Security Capital

To celebrate all ten finalists of the Security Champion category at the Women in IT Awards, Infosecurity is running a mini interview series, shining a spotlight on each of the wonderful women who are worthy of their position in the top 10 security champions category.

Today’s interviewee is finalist Jane Franland, Managing Director, Cyber Security Capital. 

Tell me in one sentence what your job is about.

My job is about helping people in cybersecurity to learn, connect and exceed.

What was your route into cybersecurity? 

I went straight into cybersecurity by building my own consultancy. It’s not a normal route, but being in my mid-twenties I was game on. Having come from a background in art and design, I’d always viewed technology as being exciting, dynamic, fun, and creative. When I started my company, Corsaire, in 1997, I chose to lead with security because of image. I viewed it as being intelligent, fun, and glamorous – a bit like James Bond – and it certainly beat selling networking kit or high availability servers. Then, early in 2000, as I saw the field evolve, I knew we needed to specialise. I saw a gap in the market and picked penetration testing.

If you could give your 21-year-old self one piece of career advice…what would it be?

Stay hungry and foolish. Love what you do. Learn, adapt and surround yourself with people who’ll lift you higher. Speak up for things you believe in but pick your battles. Serve others well, look after your personal brand and be proud to shine. Pay it forward, have fun and most importantly live your life. Oh, and read my book, IN Security!

What’s the best thing about your job?

There are so many things I love about my job, especially as it’s varied. I’m a creator, deep thinker and communicator, so I love sharing my knowledge and thought-leadership pieces through my writings, keynotes, and training. I love helping people to develop themselves, their teams and businesses too, plus solving problems. 

Serve others well, look after your personal brand and be proud to shineJane Frankland

What’s the worst?

Admin, dealing with emails and the sheer amount of time I spend travelling!

What’s your proudest achievement?

My proudest achievement undoubtedly is being a mum. My three children are my greatest gift and I am thankful for them every single day.

Who do you really admire in the industry? 

I’m a huge fan of Dame Steve Shirley, although I’d put her in the tech camp rather than cybersecurity. I also admire Rik Ferguson and Graham Cluley.

If you could change one thing about the information security sector, what would it be?

I’d change the culture. I’d like to see it become more forward thinking, flexible, progressive and inclusive.

What’s your guilty pleasure? 

The Netflix show, Suits. I hardly watch any TV but as I’m waiting for the next season of Billions and The Crown this is keeping me amused.

Jane Frankland
Jane Frankland

How did it feel to be shortlisted for the women in IT awards? 

It was an honor to be shortlisted again. It’s a prestigious award and incredibly empowering to be in a room with about 1,200 women, many of whom are leaders in their field.

What’s your take on the women in information security conversation?

I’m a huge champion of women in security but I really want to change the dialogue. I think the industry is becoming addicted to the drama of this narrative. I believe that by focusing on women we are further dividing, and I’ve felt a growing animosity whenever this is brought up. In my opinion, we need to focus on values. By doing this we remove discrimination, like gender, race, ethnicity, age, sexuality, religion, socio-economic status, education, and so on. It enables us to concentrate on ability and performance, plus value people who are different to us.

What’s your dream job?

I’d be a photographer. I’d like to photograph a variety of subject matters from people to architecture, cities and the countryside.

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