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Microsoft Pulls Two Updates After Post-Patch Tuesday Problems

Microsoft’s post-Patch Tuesday woes continued this week after Redmond was forced to pull two security fixes because of various problems they caused users.

The first incident relates to KB 3004394, and was explained in an advisory titled December 2014 Update for Windows Root Certificate Program in Windows.

It claimed that the patch had caused problems on computers running Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1) and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, most notably that it prevented said machines from installing future updates.

Microsoft has now released an update for this update titled KB3 024777 which will remove the original patch from affected users’ computers.

The other issue is with the Exchange Server 2010 SP3 Update Rollup 8.

Just a day after it was released in December’s Patch Tuesday round, Redmond claimed that it had been pulled pending a new version.

It explained the following:

“Customers should not proceed with deployments of this update until the new RU8 version is made available. Customers who have already started deployment of RU8 should rollback this update.

The issue impacts the ability of Outlook to connect to Exchange, thus we are taking the action to recall the RU8 to resolve this problem. We will deliver a revised RU8 package as soon as the issue can be isolated, corrected, and validated. We will publish further updates to this blog post regarding RU8.

This issue only impacts the Exchange Server 2010 SP3 RU8 update, the other updates remain valid and customers can continue with deployment of these packages.”

Microsoft’s patching problems have become something of a regular occurrence of late.

In October, the software giant was forced to pull a patch related to the SHA-2 Hashing Algorithm for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 because of problems reported by some users.

It was also left red-faced in August after bulletin MS14-045 was found to cause the dreaded Blue Screen of Death .

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