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Weekly brief – August 24, 2009

WINS vulnerability patch exploited

Hackers are targeting Microsoft’s service for mapping host names to network addresses, WINS, on Windows NT, 2000 and 2003 servers after a patch was released two weeks ago, reports TechWorld. According to the Internet Storm Center (ISC), internet activity associated with Port 42 has risen dramatically.

For more, see TechWorld...

Microsoft with more details on sandbox security

Microsoft has revealed more details about its new security feature in Office 2010, Protected View, which isolates office documents in a read-only, sandboxed environment that prevents malware from entering systems through rogue Office documents. According to Computerworld, security analyst John Pescatore at Gartner, has called Microsoft’s new feature “a good move”.

For more, see Computerworld...

Hackers revenge arrest

After Australian police arrested hacker Neil Gaughan, used his identity online to lure other hackers into a honey trap, and then boasted about it, hackers got their revenge. According to DailyTech, some of the hackers broke into the police system gaining access to police evidence and intelligence about federal police systems. Hackers reportedly found it amusing that police used Windows (not seen as very secure by hackers) and left the MYSQL password blank.

For more, see Daily Tech...

Patients to know about data security breaches

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has issued a rule requiring vendors of personal health records and related entities to notify patients if unsecured information is breached. If the breach involves 500 or more people, notice must also be given to media and the FTC, according to Security Dark Reading.

For more, see Security Dark Reading...

Missouri woman charged with cyberbullying

A woman from Missouri has been charged with cyberbullying after posting photos and personal information on a teenage girl on the Casual Encounters section of Craiglist, frequented by adults looking for anonymous, casual sex. According to The Register, the incident happened after the woman had a row with the girl’s mother. Missouri introduced a cyberbullying law last year.

For more, see The Register...

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